People Power

We focus so much on developing products, services, systems and policies that we can often forget about developing our employees and meeting the basics of their needs and wants. Some valuable information has been collated for you on how your employees can be the people power that you require to continue your business’s success.

Understanding Your Employees

It has been found that employees will take more interest in their work when they are encouraged and are able to share their ideas and contributions and can see them implemented. Ideally your employees just want and need:

1. to be rewarded for a job well done
2. feel involved with the business
3. feel that their contribution is valued
4. work on tasks that compliment their intelligence and fulfill their potential

Peak Performers

Give your employees encouragement and direction whenever it is needed but allow them to have control and carry out their work as they see fit. You employed them for a reason and it is usually due to their capabilities, so let them do what they need to do. Ensure you have clear and established goals and objectives that your employees understand and you will be able to ensure your employee will work to their potential.

Top Tips

Below are the 15 top tips that will help you to build your employees’ morale, meet employees’ wants and needs and improve their perception of the workforce.

1. Always relate to your employees as people and not just hired staff
2. Make sure employees see the results of their labours
3. Adjust your management style to suit individuals
4. Keep employees informed of changes at all times
5. Be clear in communicating expectations, priorities and limitations
6. Make reasonable efforts to keep jobs interesting and challenging
7. Encourage promotion from within
8. Make sure your employees are willing and able to perform what you are expecting of them, especially if there is a strict deadline or there are busy periods
9. Conduct employee performance reviews
10. Always give your employees feedback
11. Tell employees how they can get more money in their pocket
12. State clearly to your employees your management style so they understand your approach
13. Set up well understood communication lines such as meetings, etc
14. Trust your employees. If you have delegated it to them, let it go and let them do it. If they aren’t capable they shouldn’t be given the task to begin with.
15. Welcome your employees’ ideas
Get in touch and ask us to conduct a FREE Business Evaluation Meeting and find out about our unique way of designing and implementing strategies to generate sustainable business improvement.
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Forming Beneficial Strategic Alliances

Establishing a strategic alliance is not a “shake hands” deal that gets put in place and then becomes the forgotten part of your business. In order to be successful, strategic alliances must be carefully selected, rigorously tested and, like your transformed business, properly systemised in order to work effectively. Many business owners make the mistake of forming strategic alliances with unsuitable partners that end up costing the business considerable amounts – both in lost revenue, costs in unwinding the relationship and in terms of damaged goodwill. When evaluating reasons for these failures, some common trends emerge:

  • Poor planning and budgeting
  • Assuming, trusting and not checking the alliance partner’s credentials, capability, reputation etc
  • Failing to assess the strategic and cultural fit of the proposed alliance partner
  • Not properly documenting the relationship and responsibilities
  • Not agreeing (and documenting) the split of income, contribution to overheads and client ownership
  • Failing to plan and set targets for the alliance
  • Not adequately communicating the nature and purpose of the alliance to staff
  • Not providing adequate coaching or support to enable staff to cross sell or identify opportunities
  • Having poorly defined procedures to manage the flow of work

So how do you go about establishing a strong strategic alliance? We believe there are 9 essential steps after you have decided a strategic alliance is right for your business:

  1. Understand the advantages and disadvantages of a strategic alliance
  2. Conduct a rigorous analysis of your potential partner(s)
  3. Understand what you and your potential partner(s) bring to the arrangement
  4. Negotiate the arrangement
  5. Structure and document your arrangement
  6. Agree on who does what
  7. Plan
  8. Execute
  9. Manage

You will notice that nearly 90% of the process takes place before you and your strategic alliance partner start to do anything with clients. There is a good reason for this – the 90% of the time you invest in preparation will allow you two important things: time to get to know your potential alliance partner even better and time to make sure you have structured an alliance partnership that suits your business.

Get in touch and ask us to conduct a FREE Business Evaluation Meeting and find out about our unique way of designing and implementing strategies to generate sustainable business improvement.

Best Business Planning Practices

What separates a weak business plan from a good plan? Or a good plan from a great one? As with any reliable roadmap, a powerful business plan clearly lays out a course and provides alternatives to follow should any roadblocks appear.

A business plan is an important tool for internal planning in any business and for garnering support from external sources. Use the business plan best practices here to create a solid plan for your business.

Build the plan around its audience

A business plan can be used for many purposes and should be created with its use and audience in mind. You might create a plan as a tactical rollout guide for a new product or market, as an annual strategic guide, as a tool to lure investors, or as a way to get your organization excited about the coming year. The way you’ll use the plan should shape its focus. A plan aimed at raising money needs to focus on the talent and experience of your team to boost investors’ confidence in your company. It should also be slickly produced, printed and packaged. A strategic guide for internal use, on the other hand, might focus more closely on the steps required to roll out a new product. Multiple versions of your plan may be required if you have more than one audience and purpose.

Focus on finances

A strong business plan demonstrates that there is a financial impact related to all strategies, ideas, and assumptions. In one way or another, every section of your plan needs a financial bent – How will marketing generate income? How will the competitive environment impact your ability to make money? What will production of a product cost and how will that impact profitability?

Be realistic in your enthusiasm

While it is natural for a business plan to reflect a belief that your offering or approach is superior to anything else on the market, remember to temper your zeal. In creating each section of the plan, ask yourself what a sceptic would be concerned about regarding your statements and assumptions. For example, if your plan concerns a new product introduction, ask yourself about the barriers to acceptance. Always return to the “why” – Why would customers switch allegiance to you? Why would companies outsource a service to you, etc? You can put a plan to the test by sharing a rough draft with someone you know who has a sceptical nature.

Segment whenever possible

No small business can be all things to all people. Focusing on specific market segments will improve the accuracy of your planning, since you will be able to build your financial assumptions around the specific needs of those segments. Don’t limit segmentation just to your marketing efforts – the habits and values of your target audience will likely influence everything from product development to pricing.

Produce carefully

Whether you are sharing a business plan with staff only or a discriminating outside resource, features such as charts that clearly illustrate a point, statistics that back up an assertion, or judiciously-placed graphics can increase the likelihood that your audience will be receptive to your message. Once your plan is complete, have it proofread by two different people to ensure that mistakes don’t undermine its effectiveness. Also, consider the appropriate way to package a plan. A plan for bankers, partners or investors should be printed on high quality paper and bound. You can cut some corners with an internal document, but be sure your document reflects the effort you put into it.

Revise, revise, revise

A business plan is a “living” document that requires periodic review and continual improvement. Your plan may be your company’s roadmap, but your business can quickly be thrown off course by market downturns, shifting buying habits, or even better-than-anticipated sales. Review your plan regularly to see if you’re on track and adjust budgets and priorities accordingly.

Get in touch and ask us to conduct a FREE Business Evaluation Meeting and find out about our unique way of designing and implementing strategies to generate sustainable business improvement.

How to Grow and Managing a Business for Profits: Seminar

Growing and Managing a Business for Profits – What business owners need to do to boost income and manage a business through tough times

http://nuorderbusinessgrowth.eventbrite.co.uk/

Event Details:

Duration: Tuesday 13th June, 9am to 12.30pm.
Location: Mere Court Hotel Conference Centre, Mere, Knutsford, Cheshire.

Full Fee: £35 including booking fees and VAT
Early Bird Fee: £25 including booking fees and VAT (Sold Out)
Finders Fee: Receive £5 for every person you recommend who then attends the seminar.

Normally £50 + VAT, this personal invite entitles you to attend this joint seminar at a discounted rate.

Seminar Details:

Do you want to recapture your enthusiasm for your business or for the business you work for?  Are you looking for ways to grow your business and instill a sense of pride in your workforce that will result in increased profitability?

Then this is a seminar not to be missed.  Delivered by two experts in their field, Roger Brown and Lisa Gibson, the 3 ½ hour seminar programme will provide you with simple yet highly effective techniques to achieve your business aspirations.

You will come away with top tips on Social Business and the use of CRM and well as understanding the power of having the right person in the right job within any organization.

This seminar programme will benefit anyone who:

  • owns a business and wants help to grow or manage the business more effectively
  • wants tips and advice on managing and inspiring a team
  • want to increase leads and grow a client base

How do I book a place?

  1. Purchase your tickets. http://nuorderbusinessgrowth.eventbrite.co.uk/
  2. Once your booking has been received and assessed, you will be sent a booking confirmation, which will include the location, directions, and the terms and conditions.

About your speakers:

For information on Roger Brown and his testimonials visit http://www.linkedin.com/in/rogerbrownnuorder

For information on Lisa Gibson and her testimonuals visit http://www.linkedin.com/in/lisagibsontriple3

Top Twitter Business tips – nos 4

Give referrals via Twitter – what goes around come around

Top Twitter Business tips – nos 2

Follow experts, companies, competitors and industry leaders within your industry and sector.

Recruitment – Top Tips by Lisa Gibson from Triple Three Solutions

So you need to recruit someone into the business? It seems a rationale decision, you are expanding the business, you have noticed that you are working longer hours, getting home later, more customers/clients to see, those few people you do employ don’t seem to be able to take on any of the additional work you are currently doing. Those staff you recruited at the time you set the business up did a good job, but now that you are expanding and developing new markets, those staff, although still doing a good job, they don’t have the skills you need for continuing growth (or that’s what you think).

As business leaders we are faced with all sort of day to day decisions, but how to attract the right people with the right skills at the right time is probably one of the critical decisions that we make without very much thought. All we know is that there is more work needed to be done, bigger targets to achieve, less time in the day to do all the things we need to do to clear the ‘to do list’. ‘Hey Presto’ we need to get somebody – anybody – to fill the gap. I am not suggesting that as business leaders we deliberately set out to recruit poor employees who are not motivated or committed, but we do and can make hasty decisions that may mean we have mediocre performers that may not be capable of developing further than their current level of capability. How often do we hear that a member of the team who was such a good sales person or technical expert, is now failing because they have been promoted to do a bigger job that entails managing people – we promote on the basis of the ‘Peter principle’, that is to the level of the person’s incompetence. It’s important that when you recruit either internally or externally that you know what will be expected within the role and then apply an assessment process to ensure that you have the right person doing the right job.

According to Jim Collins in his ‘Good to Great’ book, one of the principles of a ‘great’ company is  First Who… Then What Collins says, “People are not your most important asset. The right people are.” He uses the analogy of a bus driver to while describing how to create a winning team within your organization. He recommends that you first get the right people on the bus, and then you get the wrong people off the bus, then the right people in the right seats, and then figure out where you want to drive that bus. Hire people with characteristics you cannot easily instill. Focus on who you are paying, not how. He also recommends analyzing someone’s character, work ethic, intelligence, and dedication to their values before deeply analyzing credentials and practical skills

Let’s consider how some decisions to recruit are made. You have given some thought to the structure of the organisation and the people who are already in your employ. You have identified specific skills that are now needed within your business and so you write down what is needed in the form of a job description and the skills that are required of the person needed to do the job. Are we always that clear of the skills required to let someone new ‘onto the bus’? When did you last properly assess the skills of the staff who already work for you – are they the ‘right people but in the wrong seat’? Could this be an opportunity to let someone in your organisation use untapped strengths that you have not already identified. If you don’t currently review your staff and any potential job opportunities in this systematic way, you may miss out and lose good people in the future. Consider how this type of planning might help in the future growth of your business and team. Giving some thought to this early on in the process will help you to get (and keep) the right people in your business.

So what happened next? Consider the next two scenarios and determine what is likely to work best for your business. You have decided that you need to look externally so…….

a. You have met someone at a networking event or you have been told by a friend that they know someone who might fit the bill, they seem OK, they are not working, they can start straight away – BINGO – problem solved. You know what you’re looking for – you have always been a good judge of character. You arrange a drink after work to ‘talk a few things through’ and the deal is done – sorted in less than a week.

…OR

b. You either advertise the job yourself or use a third party to recruit on your behalf, using the job specification to write a compelling job advertisement or a job brief for your recruitment partner. You then interview a number of shortlisted candidates against the criteria agreed, make your decision based on criteria and evidence gained during that process. You may introduce other selection criteria at this juncture – assessment centres, psychometric profiling, presentations to name but a few. The process is allowing you to determine that the individual is:

  • capable of doing the work to be done
  • inclined to work the way the organisation would wish them to work
  • mutual obligations and  expectations which are clearly defined from the beginning of the employment contract

Having considered the two scenarios described which method is likely to have the greatest effect on your business? Remember that from the moment you begin this activity you commence the employee engagement process – this sets the tone of the employee/employer relationship from the first exchange. It is important that whoever undertakes the selection process represents your business as you would expect to represent it yourself. Are you, or the person you have appointed, experienced in recruitment and selection processes?

Based on our experience there are some golden rules to consider, we have picked just 10. I am sure as you read them there will be others that you would expect to consider. Let us know, your comments are important to us.

10 Top tips on getting recruitment right:

  1. Make sure you know what skills you need to recruit, don’t leave it up to ‘I know what I want when I see it.’
  2. Have a clear job specification or role profile – for all parties involved in the process.
  3. If you have an external brand, incorporating mission and values, ensure this is used within your attraction campaign.
  4. Make sure the attraction strategy matches the needs of the business. Do you have time and inclination to advertise the role yourself, handle the response, deal with all candidates yourself, arrange interviews or do you use a third party to  handle on your behalf. If you don’t have the time, or the skills,  get someone else to do it for you – there  is nothing worse than trying to handle a response of 200 plus applicants in a poor way – it damages your company’s reputation from the outset.
  5. When it comes to interviewing the candidates yourself, ensure you have a consistent set of questions which demonstrates that you treat all candidates fairly, it’s good practice for 2 people to conduct the interview, making notes to assist with the  decision making process.
  6. Make sure that any other assessment tools used are relevant for the job being recruited. Why give someone a verbal reasoning and numerical test – if the job they are going to be employed to do doesn’t require those skills. Don’t test just for the sake of it – it has to be relevant.
  7. Have an agreed  set of criteria for selection purposes, so that you can determine the best person for the job based on their technical skills as well as broader  competencies required for the job. Remember Jim Collins’ recommendation – Hire people with characteristics you cannot easily instill. Focus on who you are paying, not how. He also recommends analyzing someone’s character, work ethic, intelligence, and dedication to their values before deeply analyzing credentials and practical skills.
  8. If no one meets the criteria – just don’t hire someone just for the sake of it. Start again. Wrong decisions may end up being costly, particularly if you need then to embark  on a performance management route, or ‘let someone go’ before the end of  their probationary period.
  9. You make a selection decision,  so make sure you take up references – use third parties to undertake this  activity if you don’t have the resources . Agree what references you want  to take that are likely to be a requirement for your business. Do you need credit checks, Criminal Records Bureau, Qualifications as well as employment  references.
  10. Agree the offer and ensure that  the appropriate paperwork is despatched and begin the preparation of inducting the new team member into the team.

Finally, if this is the first time you are embarking upon recruiting someone into your business, you need to make sure you have relevant documentation; contracts, terms and conditions of employment and a staff handbook, which describes what is expected or someone in your employ and what they can expect from you.

If in the past you have made recruitment decisions that have not been as successful as you would have hoped, or you are just thinking about recruiting someone for the first time and you need to know the implications, then call me on 07771 944676 or email lisa@triplethreesolutions.co.uk to have a no obligation discussion as to how ‘getting the right people on the bus’ forms part of your on-going recruitment strategy.

Getting people ‘off the bus’…. now that’s a completely different blog and conversation!!

Get in touch and ask us to conduct a FREE Business Evaluation Meeting and find out about our unique way of designing and implementing strategies to generate sustainable business improvement.